Citrus

Citrus

Popular Citrus Varieties

  1. Clementine de Nules

    Clementine de Nules

    Ripens October–December
    Also known as Clemenules, Nulesina, Clementina Reina, Clementina Victoria and Reina y Gorda de Nules. A mutation of Fina found in Nules, Castellon de la Plana, in 1953. Larger and a few days earlier than Fina; seedless and high quality; hangs moderately well but tends to puff if held too long. This is the most widely grown Clementine in Spain. Clementine de Nules matures in October and holds its fruit quality characteristics through December.
  2. Daisy SL

    Daisy SL

    Ripens mid December
    ‘Daisy SL’ Mandarin was developed by University of California Riverside.
    It has low-seeded, moderately large fruit that has deep orange colored flesh with a fine texture. It is a very juicy fruit with a rich, sweet distinctive flavor when it is mature. The tree habit is spreading and has excellent production beginning the 3rd year after planting.
    $2.50 per tree royalty
    photo courtesy of UC Riverside Citrus Variety Collection
  3. Fairchild LS

    Fairchild LS

    Ripens early January
    ‘Fairchild LS’ Mandarin was developed by University of California Riverside. It is a low-seeded variety that is medium-sized and deeply oblate in shape. The flesh is deep and has a fine texture. The fruit has a rich, sweet flavor when mature. The rind is a deep orange with moderately smooth texture. The tree habit is rounded, producing a dense, compact tree crown with excellent production beginning the 3rd year after planting.
    $2.50 per tree royalty
    photo courtesy of UC Riverside Citrus Variety Collection
  4. Tango Seedless Mandarin (PP#17,863)

    Tango Seedless Mandarin (PP#17,863)

    Ripens late January–May
    Fruit of the Tango seedless mandarin are similar to W. Murcott in all appearance, quality and production characteristics with the exception of seed numbers. The fruit is medium-sized for a mandarin 2.32 in. in diameter with a very smooth, deep orange rind color. The rind is relatively thin and at maturity is easy to peel. The fruit interior has fine flesh texture with 9–10 segments. The fruit are juicy averaging slightly over 50% juice. Tango matures in winter (late January) and holds its fruit quality characteristics through April into May. Production is excellent averaging 800–900 cartons/acre when planted at densities of 250–300 trees/acre. Like W. Murcott, the Tango has a tendency to overbear and therefore, needs to be regularly pruned to maintain good, not excessive production and maintain fruit size and prevent alternate bearing.
    $2.50 per tree royalty

* Royalty item

Ripening dates shown are approximate for Fresno and will vary with season and location.