Rootstock Varieties

Rootstocks

Rootstock Varieties

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  1. Mahaleb

    (cherry seedling)
    Use with cherries. More drought tolerant than Mazzard. Resists bacterial canker, smaller tree than Mazzard. Moderately resistant to crown gall and root-lesion nematode, shows buckskin infection quickly. Intolerant of wet, heavy soils, attracts gophers, tends to sucker, susceptible to oakroot fungus, some root-knot nematode susceptibility. Very susceptible to Phytophthora crown and root rot and Prunus stem pitting. Incompatible with some varieties (i.e. Van and Larian).
  2. Colt

    (cherry rooted cutting)
    Use with cherries. Tolerates wet, heavy soils better than Mahaleb, resists bacterial canker. Drought sensitive, susceptible to crown gall.
  3. Giesla 5*

    (cherry rooted cutting)
    Use with cherries. Produces a tree about 45% the size of Mazzard. Produces few if any suckers, has been called the “most productive”. Does well on heavy soils. Staking is required.
  4. Giesla 6*

    (cherry rooted cutting)
    Use with cherries. Semi-dwarfing tree, early blooming and very heavy bearing, does well on heavy soils, good virus resistance, no suckering problems. Semi-dwarfing.
  5. Giesla 12*

    (cherry rooted cutting)
    Use with cherries. Semi-dwarfing tree, about 80% the size of Mazzard, does well on heavy soils, good virus resistance, no suckering problems. Staking is recommended.
  6. M-9*

    (apple layered cutting)
    Use with apples. Crown rot resistant, very little suckering, produces earlier ripening fruit of larger size and better color. Susceptible to fireblight, anchorage is fair and requires staking, roots are brittle, not suitable for dry light soils.
  7. M-26*

    (apple layered cutting)
    Use with apples. Dwarfs to 40-50% seedling size, very precocious and productive. Shallow rooted and drought sensitive, staking usually required, moderately susceptible to collar rot and susceptible to fireblight and wooly apple aphid.
  8. M7/7a*

    (apple layered cutting)
    Use with apples. Dwarfs to 55-65% seedling size, very precocious and productive, moderately resistant to collar rot, resistant to fireblight. Suckers, susceptible to wooly apple aphid, less precocious and lower cropping efficiency than M-9 or EMLA-26.
  9. M-111*

    (apple layered cutting)
    Use with apples. Well-anchored, resists wooly apple aphid, dwarfs to 90% of seedling-rooted size, adaptable for light to heavy soils. Susceptible to crown rot.
  10. NCB

    (Northern CA Black) (walnut seedling)
    Use with walnuts. Resists Verticillium wilt, oak root fungus and root-knot nematode. Susceptible to Phytophthora, crown gall and root-lesion nematode, subject to black line.
  11. Paradox

    (NCB X English walnut hybrid seedling)
    Use with walnuts. Very vigorous, resists root-lesion nematode and certain Phytophthora species, grows better in heavy, wet or low fertility soils than NCB, resistant to oak root fungus. Highly susceptible to crown gall, may be less resistant to oak root fungus than Northern California Black, subject to black line, more susceptible to salt soils.
  12. Vlach Paradox

    (NCB X English walnut hybrid – Grown from tissue culture)
    Use with walnuts. A vigorous paradox cloned from a surviving tree planted in 1904. Chosen for its longevity, vigor and overall health. Trees on this rootstock will be comparable to trees on paradox seedlings. Vlach has shown less susceptibility to lesion nematode and slightly more resistance to crown gall, phytopthora and some species of nematodes.
  13. VX211* Paradox

    (PP#21,179) (Complex hybrid walnut grown from tissue culture)
    Use with walnuts. A very vigorous paradox cloned from a selection that has shown to be tolerant of some nematode species. It is deep rooting with many fine hair roots. Good in poor soil where vigor is needed. Moderately susceptible to crown gall and somewhat resistant to phytopthora.
  14. RX1* Paradox

    (PP#20,649) (Complex hybrid walnut grown from tissue culture)
    Use with walnuts. A vigorous paradox cloned from a selection shown to be tolerant of phytopthora. It is shallower rooting and survives well in heavy, wet soils. It is moderately susceptible to crown gall.
  15. UCD 84-121

    (NCB X English walnut hybrid seedling - Grown from tissue culture)
    Use with walnuts. A clonal paradox screened for phytopthora resistance at UC Davis. 84-121 shows a level of resistance to phytopthora citricola in early studies better than seedling paradox. A late leafing clone. Further tests need to be conducted to confirm phytopthora resistance.

* Royalty item

Ripening dates shown are approximate for Fresno and will vary with season and location.

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